Monday, January 21, 2019

Inspirational Stories - Don’t Quit – Keep Going By Edgar A. Guest

Don’t Quit – Keep Going
By Edgar A. Guest. 1921

When Things go wrong, as they sometimes will,
When the road you’re trudging seems all uphill,
When the funds are low and debts are high,
And you want to Smile but have to sigh.
When care is pressing you down a bit,
Rest, if you must, but don’t you quit.

Life is queer with its twists and turns,
As everyone of us sometimes learns,
And many a failure turns about,
When he might have won if he’d stuck it out,
Don’t give up though the pace seems slow,
You might succeed with another blow.

Often the struggler has given up,
When he might captured the victor’s cup.
And he learned too late, when the night slipped down,
How close he was to the golden crown,

Success is failure turned inside out,
The silver tint of clouds of doubt,
And you never can tell how close you are,
It may be near when it seems afar,
So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit,
It’s when things seem worst that you mustn’t quit.

Inspirational Stories

Monday, January 14, 2019

Inspirational: Believe In Yourself

Believe in Yourself
There may be days when you get up in the morning and things aren’t the way you had hoped they would be.

That’s when you have to tell yourself that things will get better.

There are times when people disappoint you and let you down.
But those are the times when you must remind yourself to trust your own judgments and opinions, to keep your life focused on believing in yourself.

There will be challenges to face and changes to make in your life, and it is up to you to accept them.

Constantly keep yourself headed in the right direction for you. It may not be easy at times, but in those times of struggle you will find a stronger sense of who you are.

So when the days come that are filled with frustration and unexpected responsibilities, remember to believe in yourself and all you want your life to be.

Because the challenges and changes will only help you to find the goals that you know are meant to come true for you.

Keep Believing in Yourself!
God loves you!

Monday, January 7, 2019

Inspirational stories: Life’s New Direction

Life’s New Direction

    Often we are like the young woman who wanted to point her life in a new direction. She went into a church, took paper and pen, and proceeded to write down a long list of things she was going to do to change her life. She signed the paper, placed it on the altar and then sat down to wait for God’s approval.

    After a time, the voice of God spoke to her inner heart: "You are going about this all wrong. Tear up what you have written."

    Reluctantly, the young woman followed God’s instruction. Then she heard the voice of God speak to her listening heart, "Take a blank sheet of paper and sign your name to it at the bottom. Place it on the altar and I’ll fill it in.

Anonymous

Appleseeds      

Monday, December 31, 2018

Stress Tips

Stress tips:
  1. Accept the fact that some days you're the pigeon, and some days you're the statue!
  2. Always keep your words soft and sweet, just in case you have to eat them.
  3. Always read stuff that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.
  4. Drive carefully... It's not only cars that can be recalled by their Maker.
  5. If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.
  6. If you lend someone $20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it.
  7. It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.
Please click here for an inspirational stress management story.

Recipe for a Happy New Year

Recipe for a Happy New Year
  1. Take twelve fine, full-grown months.
  2. See that these are thoroughly free from old memories of bitterness, rancor, and hate.
  3. Cleanse them completely from every clinging spite.
  4. Pick off all specks of pettiness and littleness.
  5. See that these months are freed from all the past.
  6. Have them fresh and clean as when they first came from the great storehouse of Time. 
  7. Cut these months into thirty or thirty-one equal parts. 
  8. Do not attempt to make up the whole batch at one time (so many persons spoil the entire lot this way) but prepare one day at a time.
  9. Into each day, put equal parts of faith, patience, courage, work (some people omit this ingredient and so spoil the flavor of the rest), hope, fidelity, liberality, kindness, rest (leaving this out is like leaving the oil out of the salad dressing— don’t do it), prayer, meditation, and one well-selected resolution. 
  10. Put in about one teaspoonful of good spirits, a dash of fun, a pinch of folly, a sprinkling of play, and a heaping cupful of good humor.
Appleseeds

You should click here for Happy New Year Wishes with cute animal pictures!

Monday, December 24, 2018

Inspirational Stories: The story behind the carol, "I Heard The Bells on Christmas Day"

The story behind the carol, "I Heard The Bells on Christmas Day"
-- Author unknown

Tragedy struck the home of America's most popular poet.  On July 9, 1861, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's wife, Fanny, was near an open window sealing locks of her daughter's hair in a packet, using hot sealing wax.  It was never known whether a spark from a match or the sealing wax was the cause, but suddenly her dress caught fire and engulfed her with flames.  Her husband, sleeping in the next room, was awakened by her screams.  He desperately tried to put out the fire and save his wife. He was severely burned on his face and hands.

She, tragically burned, slipped into a coma the next day and died.  His grievous burns would not even allow him to attend her funeral.  He seemed to lock the anguish within his soul.  Because he continued to work at his craft, only his family knew of his personal suffering.  They could see it in his eyes and observe his long periods of silence.  His white beard, so identified with him, was one of the results of the tragedy - the burn scars on his face made shaving almost impossible.
Although a legend in his own time, he still needed the peace that God gives to His children.  On Christmas Day, three years following the horrible accident - at age 57 - he sat down to try to capture, if possible, the joys of the season.  

He began:
"I heard the bells on Christmas day.
Their old familiar carols play,
And wild and sweet the words repeat
Of peace on earth, good will to men."

As he came to the third stanza he was stopped by the thought of the condition of his beloved country.  The Civil War was in full swing.  The Battle of Gettysburg was not long past.  Days looked dark, and he probably asked himself the question, "How can I write about 'peace on earth, good will to men' in this war-torn country, where brother fights against brother and father against son?"  But he kept writing - and what did he write?

"And in despair I bowed my head:
'There is no peace on earth,' I said,
'For hate is strong, and mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good will to men!"

It seems as if he could have been writing for our kind of a day.  Then as all of us should do, he turned his thoughts to the One who solves all problems - the One who can give true and perfect peace, and continued writing:

"Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
God is not dead, nor doth He sleep;
The wrong shall fail, the right prevail,
With peace on earth, good will to men."

And so we have the marvelous Christmas carol "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day."  A musician named John Baptiste Calkin wrote the musical setting that has helped make the carol a favorite.

Just as that Christmas in 1864 was made better for Longfellow, may we experience a Christmas that will be the greatest ever.  May we actually find the peace that Longfellow wrote about in the carol - true peace with God, for this is one of His greatest gifts to us.


Monday, December 17, 2018

Inspirational Stories: Christmas Story

Christmas story

Author Unknown

In September 1960, I woke up one morning with six hungry babies and just 75 cents in my pocket. Their father was gone. The boys ranged from three months to seven years; their sister was two. 

Their Dad had never been much more than a presence they feared. Whenever they heard his tires crunch on the gravel driveway they would scramble to hide under their beds.
He did manage to leave $15 a week to buy groceries. Now that he had decided to leave, there would be no more beatings, but no food either. If there was a welfare system in effect in southern Indiana, at that time, I certainly knew nothing about it.

I scrubbed the kids until they looked brand new and then put on my best homemade dress. I loaded them into the rusty old 51 Chevy and drove off to find a job. The seven of us went to every factory, store and restaurant in our small town. No luck.
The kids stayed, crammed into the car and tried to be quiet while I tried to convince whomever would listen that I was willing to learn or do anything. I had to have a job.

Still no luck.

The last place we went to, just a few miles out of town, was an old Root Beer Barrel drive-in that had been converted to a truck stop. It was called the Big Wheel. An old lady named Granny owned the place and she peeked out of the window from time to time at all those kids.

She needed someone on the graveyard shift, 11 at night until seven in the morning. She paid 65 cents an hour and I could start that night. I raced home and called the teenager down the street that baby-sat for people. I bargained with her to come and sleep on my sofa for a dollar a night. She could arrive with her pajamas on and the kids would already be asleep. This seemed like a good arrangement to her, so we made a deal.

That night, when the little ones and I knelt to say our prayers, we all thanked God for finding Mommy a job. And so I started at the Big Wheel.

When I got home in the mornings I woke the baby-sitter up and sent her home with one dollar of my tip money-fully half of what I averaged every night.

As the weeks went by, heating bills added another strain to my meager wage.

The tires on the old Chevy had the consistency of penny balloons and began to leak. I had to fill them with air on the way to work and again every morning before I could go home. One bleak fall morning, I dragged wagged myself to the car to go home and found four tires in the back seat.

New tires!

There was no note, no nothing, just those beautiful brand new tires. Had angels taken up residence in Indiana? I wondered. I made a deal with the owner of the local service station. In exchange for his mounting the new tires, I would clean up his office. I remember it took me a lot longer to scrub his floor than it did for him to do the tires. I was now working six nights instead of five and it still wasn't enough.

Christmas was coming and I knew there would be no money for toys for the kids. I found a can of red paint and started repairing and painting some old toys. Then I hid them in the basement so there would be something for Santa to deliver on Christmas morning. Clothes were a worry too. I was sewing patches on top of patches on the boys pants and soon they would be too far gone to repair.

On Christmas Eve the usual customers were drinking coffee in the Big Wheel. These were the truckers, Les, Frank, and Jim, and a state trooper named Joe. A few musicians were hanging around after a gig at the Legion and were dropping nickels in the pinball machine. The regulars all just sat around and talked through the wee hours of the morning and then left to get home before the sun came up.

When it was time for me to go home at seven o'clock on Christmas morning I hurried to the car. I was hoping the kids wouldn't wake up before I managed to get home and get the presents from the basement and place them under the tree. (We had cut down a small cedar tree by the side of the road down by the dump.) It was still dark and I couldn't see much, but there appeared to be some dark shadows in the car-or was that just a trick of the night?

Something certainly looked different, but it was hard to tell what. When I reached the car I peered warily into one of the side windows. Then my jaw dropped in amazement. My old battered Chevy was filled full to the top with boxes of all shapes and sizes. I quickly opened the driver's side door, scrambled inside and kneeled in the front facing the back seat.

Reaching back, I pulled off the lid of the top box. Inside was a whole case of little blue jeans, sizes 2-10! I looked inside another box: It was full of shirts to go with the jeans. Then I peeked inside some of the other boxes: There were candy and nuts and bananas and bags of groceries.

There was an enormous ham for baking, and canned vegetables and potatoes. There was pudding and Jell-O and cookies, pie filling and flour. There was a whole bag of laundry supplies and cleaning items. And there were five toy trucks and one beautiful little doll.
As I drove back through empty streets as the sun slowly rose on the most amazing Christmas Day of my life, I was sobbing with gratitude. And I will never forget the joy on the faces of my little ones that precious morning.

Yes, there were angels in Indiana that long-ago December. And they all hung out at the Big Wheel truck stop.

Inspirational Stories

Be sure to go here to learn about the symbols of Christmas.